National Psoriasis Foundation
Advertisement

Severe psoriasis linked to greater risk of type 2 diabetes

By Melissa Leavitt

People with severe psoriasis may be at a greater risk for developing type 2 diabetes, according to the results of a new study.

The study, published last month in the journal Circulation, also found that people with severe psoriasis may have a higher chance of developing heart disease.

Using a large database of health records from the United Kingdom, researchers evaluated the risk of coronary heart disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus, as well as stroke, among people with a range of chronic inflammatory diseases, including psoriasis.

Results indicate that “severe psoriasis was associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease,” the authors write.

The study included 85,232 people with mild psoriasis, and 5,648 people with severe psoriasis. Patients taking systemic medications were identified as having severe psoriasis. The average age for all psoriasis patients was late 40s, with an almost equal gender balance. Researchers studied patients over 11 years, from 2002 to 2013.

People with severe psoriasis were found to have a 30 percent greater risk for developing diabetes, and a 29 percent greater risk for developing heart disease. People with mild psoriasis had a 17 percent greater risk for developing diabetes, and a 3 percent greater chance of developing heart disease. This 3 percent difference is not considered to be statistically significant.

Researchers also found that higher levels of inflammation increased risk for developing these these conditions, known as comorbidities. Inflammation was measured by testing blood levels of C-reactive protein, which is increased under inflammatory conditions.

According to the authors, the study largely confirmed previous findings regarding cardiovascular risk. But unlike many other studies, the authors note, this study evaluated patients’ risk for developing multiple comorbidities, instead of focusing, for instance, just on heart disease. Considering multiple outcomes helped reveal the association between diabetes and psoriasis.

“If participants are considered to be at risk of multiple outcomes, psoriasis emerges as being strongly associated with cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus events,” the authors write.

The researchers recommend that doctors address patients’ risk for heart disease and diabetes when treating them for inflammatory diseases, and suggest that C-reactive protein levels be measured to identify patients most at risk for developing these comorbidities.

 
Advertisement


Did you enjoy this article? Want to read more?

Check out more from Psoriasis Advance »

Advertisement

 

Copyright © 1996-2013 National Psoriasis Foundation/USA

Any duplication, rebroadcast, republication or other use of content appearing on this website is prohibited without written permission of National Psoriasis Foundation. National Psoriasis Foundation does not endorse or accept any responsibility for the content of external websites.

National Psoriasis Foundation | 6600 SW 92nd Ave., Suite 300, Portland, OR 97223
getinfo@psoraisis.org | www.psoriasis.org

National Psoriasis FoundationNational Psoriasis Foundation Our Mission: To drive efforts to cure psoriatic disease and improve the lives of those affected.

CONTACT US

getinfo@psoriasis.org
800-723-9166

National Office:
6600 SW 92nd Ave., Ste. 300
Portland, OR 97223


Washington D.C. Office:
1800 Diagonal Rd., Ste. 360
Alexandria, VA 22314


Site Feedback »

Copyright © 1996-2014 National Psoriasis Foundation/USA

Any duplication, rebroadcast, republication or other use of content appearing on this website is prohibited without written permission of National Psoriasis Foundation.

The National Psoriasis Foundation does not endorse or accept any responsibility for the content of external websites.

The National Psoriasis Foundation does not endorse any specific treatments or medications for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

Member of Community Health Charities National Health CouncilFour Star Charity Navigator Rating