National Psoriasis Foundation

 
Medications

Certain medications are associated with triggering psoriasis, including:

  • Lithium: Used to treat manic depression and other psychiatric disorders. Lithium aggravates psoriasis in about half of those who take it.
  • Antimalarials: Plaquenil, Quinacrine, chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine may cause a flare of psoriasis, usually two to three weeks after the drug is taken. Hydroxychloroquine has the lowest incidence of side effects.
  • Inderal: This high blood pressure medication worsens psoriasis in about 25 to 30 percent of patients with psoriasis who take it. It is not known if all high blood pressure (beta blocker) medications aggravate psoriasis, but they may have that potential.
  • Quinidine: This heart medication has been reported to aggravate some cases of psoriasis.
  • Indomethacin: This is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug used to treat arthritis. Some people with psoriasis report it has worsened their flares. Your doctor usually can substitute indomethacin for another treatment. Indomethacin's negative effects are usually minimal when it is taken properly. Its ability to alleviate symptoms of psoriatic arthritis usually outweighs the negative impact on psoriasis.

National Psoriasis Foundation Our Mission: To drive efforts to cure psoriatic disease and improve the lives of those affected.